Indoor palm tree in a stylish living room

Best Indoor Palm Trees for the Home or Office

Are you looking for a new indoor palm tree, but don’t know where to start? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. 

Indoor palm plants can add an instant tropical vibe and liven up any space, but there are so many different kinds of indoor palms out there that it’s hard to know which one will work for you. 

In this guide, I’ll help make your choice easier by sharing my top picks for the best indoor palm trees, along with tips on how to care for them once they arrive at your home. I’ll even provide links where you can purchase my favorite indoor palms online if you find one that meets your needs.

These indoor palm trees have been carefully selected based on their ease of care, adaptability to a range of light conditions, and cost.

This article may contain affiliate links to products I know and love. You can read my full disclosure at the bottom of the page.

Overall Best Indoor Palm Tree: Parlor Palm

The Sill Parlor Palm Houseplant, Medium in White / Grant

The Parlor Palm (Chamaedorea elegans) is our top pick overall for the best indoor palm tree because it’s one of the easiest palms to grow indoors, it’s adaptable to different light conditions, and it’s budget friendly.

It’s also non-toxic according to the ASPCA, which is great if you have pets or young children.

Also called Neanthe Bella, the Parlor Palm is one of the few indoor palms that can do well in low-light conditions or under artificial light.

Just keep in mind that if this palm is in a low-light area, it will need less water than if it was in a brighter area or near a window.

The Parlor Palm is also a slow grower, so you don’t have to worry about it outgrowing it’s pot for quite some time. It will typically reach a maximum height of 4 feet when grown indoors.

Because it’s a slow grower, you should purchase the size palm you would like now rather than one that is too small because it could take many years for it to grow to your desired size.

If you have a small Parlor Palm and want to maximize it’s growth, then place your palm in a location with bright indirect light (such as near an east- or west-facing window).

Note: The Sill ships to all 48 contiguous United States

Note: Costa Farms (via Amazon) cannot ship to Arizona or California due to state restrictions. If you live in these states, order from The Sill above.

Parlor Palm Care

  • Light: Low, medium, or bright indirect light (or artificial light) will work for the Parlor Palm. Just be sure to avoid prolonged direct sunlight (a couple hours of direct light shouldn’t hurt though). If using artificial light (such as florescent office lights), the lights should be on for at least 12 hours to give your Parlor Palm an adequate amount of light.
  • Water: Water your Parlor Palm once the top 50% of the soil becomes dry (check by sticking your finger into the soil) or when your moisture meter reads 3. This palm tolerates underwatering better than overwatering.
  • Temperature: Ideal temperatures are 65 to 80°F or 18 to 27°C. Avoid temperatures below 55°F (13°C).
  • Soil: Choose a soil mix that can hold moisture but is well draining and a pot that has drainage holes. I like to use a potting mix of 1 part potting soil, 1 part perlite, and 1/2 part bark.
  • Fertilizer: Fertilize once a month with this balanced fertilizer diluted to half strength. Only fertilize while your Parlor Palm is actively growing (spring and summer).

Best Premium Indoor Palm: Kentia Palm

Buy the Kentia Indoor Palm Tree

The Kentia Palm (Howea forsteriana) is our next pick if you have more of a budget for this elegant palm and a location for the plant that gets medium or bright indirect light.

Medium light would be around 5 feet from a window, and bright indirect light would be close to an east- or west-facing window that only gets a couple hours of direct sunlight. More than just a couple hours of direct sunlight could burn the palm leaves.

For a south-facing window (which tends to get a lot of direct sunlight), the Kentia Palm would either need to be further away from the window, or you would need to filter the light by placing shear curtains over the window.

The Kentia Palm can certainly acclimate to low-light conditions as well, but it may not look as full as it would in areas with medium or bright indirect light.

Otherwise, this palm is low maintenance, sturdy, and beginner friendly, just like the Parlor Palm mentioned previously.

It’s also non-toxic according to the ASPCA.

This palm is a very slow grower, but it can eventually reach a maximum height of 6 to 12 feet indoors.

The Kentia Palm is more expensive than the Parlor Palm and other palms because it is a bit more difficult to propagate and grows very slow, so it takes a long time for the palm to mature enough to be sold.

But if you have the budget, the Kentia Palm is a beautiful choice and very easy to care for compared to many other palms.

Note: L&G ships to all 50 United States

Kentia Palm Care

  • Light: Medium or bright indirect light is best for the Kentia Palm. Low light can work, but the palm may not look as full.
  • Water: Water your Kentia Palm once the top 50% of soil becomes dry or when your moisture meter reads 3.
  • Temperature: Ideal temperatures are 65 to 85°F or 18 to 29°C.
  • Soil: Choose a soil mix that can hold moisture but is well draining and a pot that has drainage holes. I like to use a potting mix of 1 part potting soil, 1 part perlite, and 1/2 part bark.
  • Fertilizer: Fertilize once a month with this balanced fertilizer diluted to half strength. Only fertilize while your Kentia Palm is actively growing (spring and summer).

Best Indoor Palm Trees for Bright Locations Next to a Window

The Parlor and Kentia Palms can certainly do well in bright indirect light, as already discussed.

However, if you’re looking for a palm with a different look than those two AND have a bright location next to a window, then the following palms will do very well and also have easy care requirements.

Lady Palm

Buy the Indoor Lady Palm Tree

The Lady Palm (Rhapis excelsa) prefers bright indirect light (such as next to an east- or west-facing window) but can also do well in medium light.

Other than needing more light than the previously discussed palms, the Lady Palm is quite easy to care for and offers a unique look compared to the more traditional palms.

It’s also non-toxic according to the ASPCA.

Note: L&G ships to all 50 United States

Lady Palm Care

  • Light: Bright indirect light is best for the Lady Palm, but medium light can also work. A couple hours of direct sunlight shouldn’t hurt, but more than that could burn the leaves.
  • Water: Water your Lady Palm once the top 50% of soil becomes dry or when your moisture meter reads 3.
  • Temperature: Ideal temperatures are 60 to 80°F or 16 to 27°C.
  • Soil: Choose a soil mix that can hold moisture but is well draining and a pot that has drainage holes. I like to use a potting mix of 1 part potting soil, 1 part perlite, and 1/2 part bark.
  • Fertilizer: Fertilize once a month with this balanced fertilizer diluted to half strength. Only fertilize while your Lady Palm is actively growing (spring and summer).

Ponytail Palm

Link to buy the Ponytail Palm

The Ponytail Palm (Beaucarnea recurvata) is actually not a true palm at all, despite it’s name.

However, it has the look of a palm in it’s own unique way.

The Ponytail Palm is actually a succulent and has a thick trunk that functions as a water reservoir. This makes the plant quite tolerant of droughts, as well as people who forget to water their plants 😉 .

It’s also non-toxic according to the ASPCA.

The Ponytail Palm definitely needs bright light next to a window (a south-facing window is best, but east- or west-facing windows can work). This plant also does very well in full sun outdoors.

If you’re moving your plant into full sun from a shadier location, just make sure to do it gradually. Otherwise, the leaves may burn.

The main way people kill this plant is by overwatering it. Remember, it’s a succulent, which means it doesn’t need frequent watering.

Allow the soil to almost completely dry out before watering it, and then give it a good soak.

Make sure it’s potted in a well-draining potting mix and planted in a pot with lots of drainage holes so any excess water can escape to avoid root rot.

Ponytail Palm Care

  • Light: Bright light next to a window is best for the Ponytail Palm, as well as full sun outdoors.
  • Water: Water your Ponytail Palm once the soil has almost completely dried from the previous watering, then give it a good soak.
  • Temperature: Ideal temperatures are 60 to 80°F or 16 to 27°C. Avoid temperatures below 45°F (7°C).
  • Soil: Choose a soil mix that is well draining and a pot that has drainage holes. I like to use a potting mix of 2 parts any succulent soil, 1 part pumice (or perlite), and 1 part bark.
  • Fertilizer: Fertilize once a month with this cactus fertilizer only while it’s actively growing (typically spring to summer).

European Fan Palm

Link to buy the European Fan Palm

The European Fan Palm features fan-like leaves instead of the classic feathery frond leaves seen on the previously discussed palms, making it a great choice if you’re seeking that different look.

This palm does need plenty of bright light though, and even several hours of direct sunlight. So it would do best in front of a south-facing window when kept indoors.

The European Fan Palm typically grows up to 4 feet tall when potted and kept indoors. But it’s a slow grower, so you don’t have to worry about it outgrowing it’s pot or space for many years.

European Fan Palm Care

  • Light: Bright light next to a south-facing window is best for the European Fan Palm, as well as several hours of direct sunlight.
  • Water: Water your European Fan Palm once about 50% of the soil has dried from the previous watering or when your moisture meter reads 3. Then, give it a good soak.
  • Temperature: Normal room temperatures are ideal, but it is cold hardy and can survive temps of 40 to 50°F or 4 to 10°C. It may even survive temps below that, but there would be damage to the fronds.
  • Soil: Choose a soil mix that can hold moisture but is well draining and a pot that has drainage holes. I like to use a potting mix of 1 part potting soil, 1 part perlite, and 1/2 part bark.
  • Fertilizer: Fertilize once a month with this balanced fertilizer diluted to half strength. Only fertilize while your European Fan Palm is actively growing (spring and summer).

Indoor Palms with Slightly More Difficult Care

Majesty Palm

Link to buy the Majesty Palm

The Majesty Palm (Ravenea rivularis) is a beautiful palm and quite popular, but it can be a bit more difficult to care for than other palms. If you’re looking for a similar-looking palm that’s easy to care for, go with the Parlor Palm!

However, if you have your heart set on the Majesty Palm, here’s a few important things to know.

This palm does best in bright indirect light. This means placing it in front of an east- or west-facing window. It won’t be happy in an area with low light.

It also needs humidity (50% or higher), so if you’re in a more arid climate or you run your central heating/cooling a lot (which can dry out the air in your home), you may need to invest in a humidifier (I recommend this humidifier) to keep the majesty palm happy.

It’s also best to not let the soil completely dry out. Once the top 2-3 inches of soil is dry (test with your fingers), then water it.

But it’s also important that the soil is well draining and the pot has plenty of drainage holes so the soil isn’t so soggy that the roots rot.

Majesty Palm Care

  • Light: Bright indirect light next to an east- or west-facing window is best for the Majesty Palm.
  • Water: Water your Majesty Palm once the top 2-3 inches of soil has dried from the previous watering or when your moisture meter reads 3 to 4. Then, give it a good soak.
  • Temperature: Ideal temperatures are 65 to 85°F or 18 to 29°C.
  • Soil: Choose a soil mix that can hold moisture but is well draining and a pot that has drainage holes. I like to use a potting mix of 1 part potting soil, 1 part perlite, and 1/2 part bark.
  • Fertilizer: Fertilize once a month with this balanced fertilizer diluted to half strength. Only fertilize while your Majesty Palm is actively growing (spring and summer).
  • Toxicity: Non-toxic according to the ASPCA.

Cat Palm

Link to buy the Cat Palm

The Cat Palm (Chamaedorea cataractarum) has the same care requirements as the Majesty Palm.

So if you prefer the look of the Cat Palm, just follow the same care guidelines as the Majesty Palm above, and your palm should thrive well.

The Cat Palm is a type of Chamaedorea, which are non-toxic according to the ASPCA.

Poisonous Palm Plants

I wanted to also make you aware of a few toxic palms that you might want to avoid, especially if you have pets or young children. And some are more common than you’d think!

Sago Palm

Sago Palm Tree

According to VCA Hospitals, every part of the Sago Palm is poisonous, but the seeds are the most toxic for pets. They state that each year, hundreds of calls are made to the Pet Poison Helpline due to ingestion of Sago Palm-related plants.

Symptoms of Sago Palm poisoning include vomiting, bloody stool, jaundice, bruising, liver damage/failure, and death according to the ASPCA.

If you have pets or small children, it’s important to avoid the Sago Palm and any plants that are related to it, such as the Coontie Palm, Fern Palm/Queen Sago, and Cardboard Palm.

Cardboard Palm

Cardboard Palm Tree

According to the ASPCA, cardboard palms (Zamia furfuracea) are considered poisonous to cats, dogs, and horses. Symptoms of poisoning include vomiting, dark stool, bloody diarrhea, liver failure, and death. Even 1-2 seeds can be fatal, so this is definitely a palm to avoid if you have pets or small children.

Formosa Palm / Arenga Palm / Sugar Palm

The Formosa Palm (Arenga engleri) produces a fruit that can cause a severe allergic reaction, though it’s typically considered less toxic than the sago palm.

It’s still best to avoid having this palm if you have pets or young children.

Fishtail Palm

Fishtail Palm Plant

The Fishtail Palm (Caryota mitis) is also known to cause an allergic reaction if it’s berries are ingested according to NC State Extension. It’s another palm to avoid if this could be an issue due to pets or small children.

Best Indoor Palm Trees for the Home or Office

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